Magic Winter: Luce Farm

Magic winter
Magic world
Calling me back to memories
So wide and known.
Separating myself from the dire day
Where hard labor wins my bread,
What I truly seek is
Snowy freedom.

stanzas from Christmas Time, by Paul Mollomo, II

Mole's Map



Jan. 18     Walked  up to the old oak corner and then around the pasture.  A mole left tracks and tunnels all over the field.  His ramblings in the snow resembled a giant map of the world and I wondered if he found a safe route home. 

Common Redpolls



Jan. 13    It was easy to identify the lively flock of about fifty birds at the feeder  as Common Redpolls. Their sharply pointed bill and  the  black spot in the middle of the throat were my first clues to who these Arctic visitors might be.    Looking out the window through binoculars, the red crown-cap became obvious.  Unlike the Chickadees who take one seed, then fly off the eat it, the Common Redpolls have a pouch in their throat that allows them to store many seeds.  Redpolls spook easily and  arrive  and depart as a cohesive unit twittering cheerful notes in their flight.  

White-breasted Nuthatch



Jan. 10     The White-breasted Nuthatch is as happy upside down as he is right side up.   A polite bird, he squeaks a nasal thank you when I fill the feeders with fresh sunflower  seeds.  I am fond of his jaunty profile that is enhanced by  a longish turned-up beak.  

Baltimore Oriole Nest



Jan. 6     Today   I  noticed  another Baltimore Oriole's  nest swaying on a  branch over the road in an  American  Elm tree that has so far escaped the ravages of Dutch Elm Disease.  I  have waited and watched  as the tree  grew  in girth and height and hoped that it would someday  be large enough to welcome an oriole family.  The summer of 2012 was the first time that happened  but I  never knew  it until today.